Help Save The Planet

DIDYOUKNOW22

At BerryBreeze™ we recognize our obligation to taking care of the precious land, water, and living things that make up our environment. Food waste is a worldwide epidemic. It is also a large contributor to methane emissions globally. We all have a stewardship to the land and we need to stop wasting our valuable resources and polluting the planet. BerryBreeze™ reduces your carbon footprint for a greener planet by
a) helping food last longer so we waste less
b) reducing plastic containers, bags, and wraps


Model-based climate change detection/attribution studies have linked increasing tropical Atlantic SSTs to increasing greenhouse gases. If the correlation between tropical Atlantic SSTs and hurricane activity shown in Figure 1 is used to infer future changes in Atlantic hurricane activity, the implications are sobering: the large increases in tropical Atlantic SSTs projected for the late 21st century would imply very substantial increases in hurricane destructive potential–roughly a 300% increase in the PDI by 2100

(SST = sea surface temperatures)

http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/global-warming-and-hurricanes


Did you know how badly landfills containing wasted food harm the environment?

Lifestyle has a great effect on waste generation, but just as important are the local rules governing waste and what can be recycled. In San Francisco, for instance, residents are required to separate their food waste for compost pickup rather than put it into trash destined for landfill. In most other municipalities, food waste goes to a landfill dump. Almost all of our families learned that they could shrink their waste footprint considerably if they wasted less prepared food. This was the single most dynamic change they could make to have an immediate impact on their household waste.

According to the EPA, more food reaches landfills and incinerators than any other single material in municipal solid waste. One of the biggest improvements that municipalities can make is to divert food waste to facilities that produce compost, which is beneficial to agriculture and better for the environment, rather than to landfill dumps where it rots and produces methane.

Raphael, Isabelle (April 4, 2014), What a Waste! See How Much a Typical American Family Throws Away in a Week,  The Reporter-Times of Martinsville & Morgan Co., In. http://www.reporter-times.com/entertainment/parade/living/what-a-waste-see-how-much-a-typical-american-family/article_d3f9fa56-b357-5baa-af28-9180219f8f81.html

When you think of steps that can be taken to improve our environment and mitigate climate change, “reducing food waste” probably doesn’t come to mind right away. But in fact, food waste is an important factor in climate change, because wasted food represents 20 percent by weight of the solid waste going to landfills. This decomposing food quickly generates methane, a greenhouse gas 21 percent more potent than carbon dioxide…At the end of the day, reducing food waste isn’t just about “cleaning your plate,” it’s about ensuring that cutting-edge technology is used to help get food to consumers rather than landfills.

Fireovid, Robert (July, 2013) Reducing Food Waste: It’s More Than Just Cleaning Your Plate, US Department of Agriculture Blog, http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/07/11/reducing-food-waste-its-more-than-just-cleaning-your-plate/

Getting food from the farm to our fork eats up 10 percent of the total U.S. energy budget, uses 50 percent of U.S. land, and swallows 80 percent of all freshwater consumed in the United States. Yet, 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. This not only means that Americans are throwing out the equivalent of $165 billion each year, but also that the uneaten food ends up rotting in landfills as the single largest component of U.S. municipal solid waste where it accounts for a large portion of U.S. methane emissions.

Gunders, Dana (August, 2012), Wasted: How America Is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill, Natural Resources Defense Council Issue Paper

http://www.nrdc.org/food/files/wasted-food-ip.pdf

Each year, food that is produced but not eaten guzzles up a volume of water equivalent to the annual flow of Russia’s Volga River and is responsible for adding 3.3 billion tons of greenhouse gases to the planet’s atmosphere.

http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/196220/icode/


Did you know using less plastic bags and containers can help save the planet?

Even though recycling centers are becoming spectacularly more sophisticated and efficient, a current issue is having to collect items for which they don’t yet have customers or a mature market. This includes whole categories of materials, like number 6 plastic (cheap take-out containers, disposable plates, and cups made of polystyrene). Municipalities don’t want to confuse residents by having them pick and choose which rigid plastics to recycle so they’re told to put all of them in the recycling bin, even if there isn’t yet a market for some of it.

Raphael, Isabelle (April 4, 2014), What a Waste! See How Much a Typical American Family Throws Away in a Week,  The Reporter-Times of Martinsville & Morgan Co., In. http://www.reporter-times.com/entertainment/parade/living/what-a-waste-see-how-much-a-typical-american-family/article_d3f9fa56-b357-5baa-af28-9180219f8f81.html

Researchers at San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography have released a study that claims plastic in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch has increased by 100 times the amount of what was found in the region 40 years ago. Insects at the bottom of food chain are laying eggs in the pieces of small plastic that are ubiquitous in this area the size of Texas. While the Pacific Garbage Patch is commonly perceived to be an endless mess of plastic bottles and trash bobbing up and down in the water, the reality is that thousands of square miles of the ocean’s surface is covered by tiny bits of plastic that have broken down to the size of a human fingernail.

Kaye, Leon (5/09/12) Scripps Study Shows Plastic in Pacific Garbage Patch Has Increased 100-Fold | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

Evidence is mounting that the chemical building blocks that make plastics so versatile are the same components that might harm people and the environment. And its production and disposal contribute to an array of environmental problems, too. For example:

• Chemicals added to plastics are absorbed by human bodies. Some of these compounds have been found to alter hormones or have other potential human health effects.
• Plastic debris, laced with chemicals and often ingested by marine animals, can injure or poison wildlife.
• Floating plastic waste, which can survive for thousands of years in water, serves as mini transportation devices for invasive species, disrupting habitats.
• Plastic buried deep in landfills can leach harmful chemicals that spread into groundwater.
• Around 4 percent of world oil production is used as a feedstock to make plastics, and a similar amount is consumed as energy in the process.

Knoblauch, Jessica A. (July, 2009) The Environmental Toll of Plastics, Environmental Health News, http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/dangers-of-plastic

Over 46,000 pieces of plastic litter are floating on every square mile of ocean today. In the Central Pacific, there are up to 6 pounds of marine litter to every pound of plankton.

Nuttall, Nick (June, 2006), Action Urged to Avoid Deep Trouble in the Deep Seas, United Nations Environment Programme, http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=480&ArticleID=5300&l=en

More than 80 percent of recyclable plastic bottles end up in landfills each year. They do not break down naturally and release toxic chemicals when they finally do decompose.

Dell’Amore, Christine & Karlstrom, Solvie (March, 2010), Why Tap Water is Better than Bottled Water, NationalGeographic.com, http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/03/100310/why-tap-water-is-better/


Did You know that methane is produced as a result of human food consumption, both through the cattle we raise and the food we throw away?

When you think of steps that can be taken to improve our environment and mitigate climate change, “reducing food waste” probably doesn’t come to mind right away. But in fact, food waste is an important factor in climate change, because wasted food represents 20 percent by weight of the solid waste going to landfills. This decomposing food quickly generates methane, a greenhouse gas 21 percent more potent than carbon dioxide…At the end of the day, reducing food waste isn’t just about “cleaning your plate,” it’s about ensuring that cutting-edge technology is used to help get food to consumers rather than landfills.

Fireovid, Robert (July, 2013) Reducing Food Waste: It’s More Than Just Cleaning Your Plate, US Department of Agriculture Blog, http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/07/11/reducing-food-waste-its-more-than-just-cleaning-your-plate/

Although burning natural gas as a transportation fuel produces 30 percent less planet-warming carbon dioxide emissions than burning diesel, the drilling and production of natural gas can lead to leaks of methane, a greenhouse gas 30 times more potent than carbon dioxide…Those methane leaks negate the climate change benefits of using natural gas as a transportation fuel….The study concludes that there is already about 50 percent more methane in the atmosphere than previously estimated by the Environmental Protection Agency, a signal that more methane is leaking from the natural gas production chain than previously thought.

Davenport, Coral (February 13, 2014) Study Finds Methane Leaks Negate Benefits of Natural gas as a Fuel for Vehicles, The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/14/us/study-finds-methane-leaks-negate-climate-benefits-of-natural-gas.html

Environmental advocates have long urged the Obama administration to target methane emissions. Most of the planet-warming greenhouse gas pollution in the United States comes from carbon dioxide, which is produced by burning coal, oil and natural gas. Methane accounts for just 9 percent of the nation’s greenhouse gas pollution — but the gas is over 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide, so even small amounts of it can have a big impact on future global warming.

In June, the Agriculture Department, the Energy Department and the E.P.A. will release a joint “biogas road map” aimed at accelerating adoption of methane digesters, machines that reduce methane emissions from cattle, in order to cut dairy-sector greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020…Since cattle flatulence and manure are a significant source of methane, farmers have long been worried that a federal methane control strategy could place a burden on them.

Davenport, Coral (March 28, 2014) White House Unveils Plans to Cut Methane Emissions, The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/29/us/politics/white-house-unveils-plans-to-to-cut-methane-emissions.html